Brooklyn Bridge Architectural Wire Art Sculpture Model

Brooklyn Bridge Architectural Wire Art Sculpture Model
Item# DI3109017
$99.95
Sorry, not currently available,

Product Description

SOLD OUT - RETIRED DESIGN

13.6 x 2.8 x 4.7"

This artistic interpretation of the Brooklyn Bridge is a hand tied and hand decorated sculpture in wire worthy of display on the most impressive desk, cabinet, or dining table. It is one of the Doodles Destinations Series of architectural landmarks. It is quite sturdy and solid, not really flexible at all.

The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States, stretching 5,989 feet over the East River, connecting the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Upon completion in 1883, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world, the first steel-wire suspension bridge, and the first bridge to connect to Long Island.

At the time it opened, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world 50% longer than any previously built and it has become a treasured landmark. For several years the towers were the tallest structures in the Western Hemisphere. Since the 1980s, it has been floodlit at night to highlight its architectural features. The towers are built of limestone, granite, and Rosendale cement. Their architectural style is neo-Gothic, with characteristic pointed arches above the passageways through the stone towers.

The Brooklyn Bridge opened to great fanfare in May 1883. The names of John Roebling, Washington Roebling, and Emily Warren Roebling are inscribed on the structure as its builders. John Roebling designed it with three separate systems managing even unanticipated structural stresses. The bridge has a suspension system, a diagonal stay system, and a stiffening truss. "Roebling himself famously said if anything happens to one of [his] systems, 'The bridge may sag, but it will not fall.'"

Since its opening, it has become an iconic part of the New York skyline. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964.

(some information adapted from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia)